Weekend pop art: The whimsical joy of Accidentally Wes Anderson

(cover image via Laughing Squid (c) Wally Koval/AccidentallyWesAnderson Instagram account)

SNAPSHOT
Join us to discover the most interesting and idiosyncratic places on Earth. Inspired by the unique vision of director Wes Anderson’s films, this book travels to every continent to tell the extraordinary and unexpected true stories behind more than two hundred stunning locations. (synopsis via Laughing Squid)

Plague-ridden 2020 has denied us a great many things and among them is the latest Wes Anderson film, The French Despatch which has moved from 16 October (so, next week) to 23 July next year.

Thankfully we still have Wes Anderson’s previous releases such as Isle of Dogs, The Grand Budapest Hotel and Moonrise Kingdom to re-watch and enjoy, and of course the Instagram wonder that is Accidentally Wes Anderson which charts all kinds of places around the world that look like they have been created for a Wes Anderson but are in fact magically, spontaneously there, just because.

Wally Koval is the man behind this escapist joy and he has, so Laughing Squid assures us, assembled a book that “showcases 200 different locations over 368 pages and [which] features a foreword by Anderson himself.”

You know that tired old coffee table of yours that needs a bit of a revamp?

It needs this book which you can get from major retailers around the world who, if they have any sense at all, will immediately relocate one of these wonderfully idiosyncratic locations because how could you not be happy there?

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____________________ Paseo YMCA Kansas City, Missouri c. 1914 • Making strides to bridge the racial divide in Kansas City, the Paseo YMCA exemplifies the ability for Americans to unite for a greater cause. Established during the era of racial segregation and Jim Crow laws, the Paseo YMCA emerged as a historic community center and served as the meeting place for the formation of the Negro National League • Black and white civic leaders began working together to bring a YMCA to Kansas City in 1900. Two years later, measures were taken to open an African American branch and by 1907 a formal campaign was launched with the goal of raising $10,000 to build a new, modern facility. The proposed location was the Paseo District, the most populated African American community • By 1910, Jewish philanthropist Julius Rosenwald announced that he would offer $25,000 to any city that would raise $75,000 for an African American YMCA building. Kansas City quickly rose to the challenge — Black community members raised $30,000 and another $50,000 was donated to the cause by the white community. Within a year, a large four-story brick building was completed and officially named the Paseo YMCA • Six years later, eight independent Black baseball team owners met at the Paseo YMCA to form the Negro National League, the first organized Black baseball league. Led by Andrew “Rube” Foster and Kansas City’s Buck O’Neill, the League operated in mostly in the Midwest before expanding into the South • The Negro National League closed in 1931, but lives on as the first of many successful organized Black baseball leagues. To commemorate its groundbreaking influence in American sports, the Paseo YMCA is now home to the Negro League Baseball Museum which is currently constructing the Buck O’Neil Education and Research Center, devoted to the study and archival of Negro Leagues history • Know more? Please comment below! • 📸: @ryanswift ✍️: @Kelly.Murray 📰: @wikipedia + aahtkc.org + kcur.org + kansascityymca.org + nlbm.com • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #Symmetrical #Archigram #AccidentalWesAnderson #WesAnderson #ig_architecture #KansasCity #VisitMo

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Happy Monday Adventurers 👋 We have been giant fans of @GeliKlein’s work for more than 3 years – so it is just amazing to have this incredible photo of hers included in our Book 📚 (pre-sale in Bio 🎉) • Today, we head to Cologne where to explore a beautiful pastel pink pop of Art Deco awesomeness 💕 Hope you enjoy this sneak peek from our first printed collection 📖 (PS: 3 days left to enter for a copy signed by the Actual Wes Anderson ✍️🥰) – – – Die Bastei Cologne, Germany c. 1924 • “Die Bastei, an art deco wonder, sits atop what were once medieval Prussian ramparts, overlooking the Rhine River in Cologne, Germany (Die Bastei is German for “the bastion”). Designed in 1924 by architect Wilhelm Riphahn, the back of this restaurant exposes curved windows hovering just over the Rhine, giving the impression of a floating platform” • “At the time of construction, it was viewed as a controversial experiment—regarded as an eyesore by some, with others fretting that it would impair the view to the cathedral. As time went on, it was embraced by Cologne’s most stylish patrons, who flocked to Die Bastei for its haute cuisine and panoramic views” • “The building was destroyed in 1943 but restored in 1958—again by Riphahn, who took great pride in his work of art. It was during this renovation that he added a cherry on top: an illuminated trident for the roof.” • #AccidentallyWesAnderson​ ​#AccidentalWesAnderson​ ​#WesAnderson​ ​#VscoArchitecture​ ​#Vscotravel #Koelnergram #Awesomeminimal #srs_germany #Unlimitedminimal #DieBastei #Colognecity #VisitGermany #Germany🇩🇪

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____________________ Getty Center Los Angeles, California c. 1997 • The Getty Center is the result of the personal art collection of J. Paul Getty, the founder of the Getty Oil Company and at one time, the world’s wealthiest man. Yet, it was his frugal nature and razor-sharp negotiation skills that would prove most memorable when he helped release his grandson from kidnapping in 1973 • On July 10th, the Italian mafia organization 'Ndrangheta kidnapped John Paul Getty III in Rome’s Piazza Farnese. Only 16 years old, Getty III was blindfolded, transported, and imprisoned in a cave in the region of Calabria. When a ransom note for $17 million emerged in exchange for his safety, the Getty family suspected the teenager plotted the incident himself to get money from his grandfather • Getty initially refused the ransom, convinced that if he paid, his other grandchildren could become targets, too. But the kidnapping was no ruse. When the second ransom demand wasn’t met, Getty III endured increased toruture and three months later, his severed ear was mailed to a local newspaper. This time, the captors demanded $3.2 million and promised to mutilate Getty III if their request wasn’t met • Getty then agreed to pay $2.2 million (equivalent of $12.7 million in 2019) for his grandson’s rescue. After the ransom was paid, Getty III was found at a petrol station in the province of Potenza. Nine of the kidnappers were arrested, but only two were convicted and sent to prison. Most of the ransom money was never recovered • Through his fortune and fortitude, Getty’s legacy lives on in both his grandson’s rescue and the Getty Center in Los Angeles. A passionate art collector, the museum started in Getty’s home and has now expanded throughout the vast museum. At the Center, visitors can view pre-20th century European artwork, including Van Gogh’s masterpiece “Irises” • Know more? Please comment below! • 📸: @vanshika_arora16 ✍️: @kelly.murray 📰: @wikipedia + discoverlosangeles.com + getty.edu • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #Archigram #AccidentalWesAnderson #VscoTravel #VscoArchitecture #Pursuewhatislovely #DiscoverLA #LosAngeles #AccidentallyLA #GettyMuseum

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Hey Adventurers 👋 Here‘s a sneak peek from our new book 🥰📚 (link in Bio 🎉) Today we land in lovely Lisbon 🇵🇹 for (a snippet of) the story behind one of the most picturesque and unique modes of codependent public conveyance 🚋 • This stunning shot was snapped by the always impressive @JackSpicerAdams 👏 In addition to his feature in our beautiful Book 📖 he also happens to be a phenomenal food photographer with a fantastic feed to match ❤️ – – – Ascensor da Bica 🚋 Lisbon Portugal 🇵🇹 c. 1892 • “The charming Ascensor da Bica is one of Lisbon’s three funicular railway cars. A funicular railway car differs from a standard tram through its reliance on its twin. Two passenger vehicles are pulled on a slope by a single cable looped around a pulley wheel at the top. The pair move in perfect synchronicity: one vehicle ascends as its descending partner counterbalances it • This unique mode of codependent public conveyance, which bears similarities to a kind of outdoor elevator, was initially powered by a water system — a car at the top of the hill was loaded up with water until it was heavy enough for gravity to assist in its descent, thus pulling its counterbalanced twin up to the top of the hill. In 1896 the system became steam-powered, and in 1924 it was electrified • Ascensor (or Elevador) da Bica climbs 800 feet up one of the city’s steepest hills. A delightful, leisurely ride and a hop off at the top leads you to Miradouro de Santa Luzia, a terrace from which to marvel at the distinct rooftops of Europe’s western- most capital city” • PS: Enter our Giveaway (link in bio 🎉) to read the Full Story & get some other beautiful goodies 🥰 • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #Symmetrical #AccidentalWesAnderson #WesAnderson #Pursuewhatislovely #igerslisboa #Lisboa #Portugal🇵🇹

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____________________ Grossglockner High Alpine Road • Salzburg, Austria • c. 1935 • Reaching elevations of 8,215 feet (2,504 meters), the Grossglockner High Alpine Road is the highest surfaced mountain pass road in Austria. Named after the country’s tallest mountain, the Road connects the municipalities of Bruck and Heiligenblut by way of a stunning scenic route • In 1924, plans to build a road over the high pass were first proposed but were met with ridicule. At the time, there were only 154,000 privately owned cars, 92,000 motorcycles, and 1200 miles of asphalt roads within the countries of Austria, Germany, and Italy. Struggling in the aftermath of WW1, Austrian officials deemed the projects too expensive • Yet in the years to come, the economic situation worsened and the New York stock market crash in 1929 only compounded the problems worldwide. The Austrian government revisited the road proposals and decided to revive the project as a way to provide jobs. In August 1930, the first explosives were set off to start construction and within five years, the Grossglockner High Alpine Road was officially opened • Upon its opening, the road planners anticipated an average of 120,000 visitors, but by 1938 more than triple their estimate were making their way through the road’s winding curves. After WW2, the number of visitors continued to grow and by the 1960s over 1 million people regularly crossed the high mountain pass • Totalling approximately 30 miles (48 km), the High Alpine Road offers various views of meadows, glaciers, and of course, Grossglockner known as the black mountain. The High Alpine Road has not only become a stunning landmark, but it has played a pivotal role in the development of Alpine roads for motorized vehicles • Know more? Please comment below! • 📸: @lucthrough ✍️: @kelly.murray 📰: @wikipedia + whc.unesco.org + grossglockner.at • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #Archigram #AccidentalWesAnderson #WesAnderson #Pursuewhatislovely #VisitAustria #PastelAesthetic #Pursuewhatislovely #FeelAustria #DiscoverAustria #Salzburg #grossglockner #Salzburgland #Austria🇦🇹

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